Neonatal and Infant Imaging

Neonatal and Infant Imaging

 

 

     BPD is a common and serious complication of premature birth, but its severity is graded by clinically-assessed need for respiratory support, which can vary with institutional standards. The underlying cardiopulmonary disease, structural pathology, and disease trajectory are not well characterized. Recent work performed in our BPD Center has demonstrated that MRI-based evaluation of lung disease in early life can describe disease severity and predict short-term respiratory outcomes in neonatal BPD patients better than individual standard clinical measures, without requiring sedation or ionizing radiation. These results support the wider implementation of pulmonary MRI in early life as a clinical measure and predictor of lung disease trajectories. Importantly, visualization of regional and structural pathologies via MRI may help in the near future to phenotype disease and to serially monitor efficacy of personalized BPD therapies.

    Our research group also investigates cardio-respiratory disease in infants with congenital abnormalities, such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) or esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF). This work has led to new MRI-based methods for visualizing abnormal cardio-respiratory structure, as well as quantifying diseased tissue densities, cardiac output, and dynamic diaphragmatic and airway function.

 

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